Replace fuel filler neck rubber seal

Discussion in 'How To' started by rob.e, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. Following on from this thread
    http://thelatebay.com/index.php?threads/opinion-on-fuel-filler-neck.74676/
    .. and specifically the question as to whether its possible to do with the engine in place, i though i'd post up here how i did mine.

    There may be other ways to do this and there may be better ways (feel free to contribute if there's anything i've missed or done wrong).

    So on my bus i'd already checked all the breathers, replaced where necessary and replaced fuel lines BUT i still got an occasional whif of fuel after a fill up (full tank) and only in tight left turns. I'd fitted a new fuel cap too since i got the bus so i knew that was not the issue.

    The symptoms lead me to think it could be the seal between the filler neck and the body of the bus. Judging by what i could see it looked to be original, so 40 yrs old. Not good.

    Replacement is a pig of a job but not impossible with the engine in. Here's how i did mine:

    1. disconnect the battery, you don't want a risk of sparks if you're doing anything with fuel
    2. remove the filler cap and block up the pipe to avoid anything dropping in - i used a scrunched up plastic bag; fills the hole and easy enough to retrieve when you're done
    3. remove the clamping ring around the rubber seal (4 screws). this is #5 in the pic from Ratwell:

    [​IMG]

    4. get access behind the firewall; you don't need to fully remove the firewall but it does need to be unscrewed all the way around, with a bit of wiggling it'll come forward enough to give you access. You need to unplug the wires into the voltage regulator (silver box on the rhs of the firewall) 3 visible screws each side secure the firewall plus there should be two that come up from underneath - mine were missing.
    5. inorder to get the firewall free i also had to remove the air filter from the left hand side carb on mine. if you're running a different carb set up or injection you might not need to do this. block off the top of the carb to avoid anything dropping in.

    firewall leaning forward for access:
    [​IMG]
    firewall removal
    by Rob E, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    fuel filler seal
    by Rob E, on Flickr

    6. with the firewall leaning forward you can see the rubber #6 in the pic. I found that even with both of the jubilee clamps on this loosened off there was NO movement in the filler pipe.. what you need to do is to separate the rubber elbow at the top end of the pipe from the bus (mine was perished and felt like it was welded to the bodywork, needed some persuasion to break it free) then push this inside. With this loose inside the bus there is enough movement to slide the pipe #7 out from the rubber #6 then pull it out through the paint tin lid inspection hatch.

    Here's my original 40 yr old seal - you can see the split where fuel was getting through:
    [​IMG]
    old fuel filler seal
    by Rob E, on Flickr

    7. With the metal filler pipe out of the van, first mark up where the rubber elbow sits on the pipe so you can get the new part in the same orientation. Remove the old and fit the new rubber incl the clamp. you can then post the metal pipe with the new rubber elbow fitted back in through the paint tin lid inspection hatch.

    [​IMG]
    fuel filler seal
    by Rob E, on Flickr

    8. get the pipe in approximately the correct orientation and push it back into pipe #6 but don't do up the clamp yet
    9. lift up the filler end to the hole in the body work and get the rubber flange out through the hole. this isn't easy but i tried adding some cable ties to the holes to help get it through. once it's through then you can do up the clamp on #6.

    if you try to get the rubber flange thorugh the bodywork before you've located the bottom of the pipe into #6 there isn't enough wiggle to get it on afterwards.

    [​IMG]
    fuel filler seal
    by Rob E, on Flickr

    10. put everything back together, go get some elastoplasts for the cuts :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2018
    Day, sANDYbAY, mcswiggs and 4 others like this.
  2. Hero!:thumbsup:
     
    rob.e likes this.
  3. Excellent write up. I’ve been putting off doing this because I thought it was an engine out job, and I’d repaired the top rubber elbow from the inside with a judicious use of a puncture repair kit. Will give this a try.
     
    rob.e likes this.

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